Venice – A City Unlike Any Other – Day 2 – Part 4

Crossing the Rio di Palazzo, the Ponte dei Sosperi, or the Bridge of Sighs, is the second most famous bridge in Venice.  It was designed by Antonio Contino, and dates from 1600.  It connects the prison area with the interrogation rooms of the Doges Palace.  After being sentenced in the Palazzo, prisoners were then led…

Venice – A City Unlike Any Other – Day 2 – Part 2 – Rialto

The monument pictured above pays tribute to the Venetians who lost their lives in the Holocaust. Up to this point, we had managed to avoid any of the horrible crowds that Venice is notorious for, especially around the Easter holiday.  But, as we approached the Ponte di Rialto, or the Rialto Bridge, the crowds began…

Venice – A City Unlike Any Other – Day 2 – Part 1

We began our Easter Sunday with a lovely breakfast, which consisted of fresh fruit, cold meats, coffee, yogurt, and a colomba di Pasqua, which is the Easter equivalent of a panettone.  It was a beautiful day out, so we wasted no time in getting out there, and exploring the city a bit more, once breakfast…

Venice – A City Unlike Any Other – Day 1 – Part 2

The largest campo close to our apartment was Campo San Giacomo, which was about a five-minute walk away.  This was the campo we would visit most often during our stay in Venice, as it held numerous cafés and shops, as well as a small supermarket, where we could pick up items we needed.  The campo…

Venice – A City Unlike Any Other – Day 1 – Part 1

My first visit to Venice was over thirty years ago, so it was time to return.  Now, older and wiser, I was able to experience the city in a new way.  Venice, like most Italian cities, has many layers.  The different layers only reveal themselves when one takes the time to breathe, to explore, and…

Milan – A City that Never Grows Old – Day 3 – Part 4

At Via Giosuè Carducci, # 36, you will find Castello Cova, or as it is also known, Palazzo Viviani Cova.  The palazzo dates from 1910, and was designed by the architect Adolfo Coppedè. The Pusterla di Sant’Ambrogio is one of the ten city gates that were part of Milan’s medieval system of defensive walls.  The…

Milan – A City that Never Grows Old – Day 3 – Part 3

Our next stop turned out to be the studio-museum of the sculptor Francesco Messina.  Messina is considered to be one of the most important artists, when it comes to figurative sculpture of the 20th century.  Originally from Sicily, he made Milan his home, and the deconsecrated Church of San Sisto al Carrobbio, his studio.  Now,…

Milan – A City that Never Grows Old – Day 3 – Part 2

On Piazza Borromeo, you will find the Church of Santa Maria Podone.  This Greek Orthodox Church, which is dedicated to the Holy Mother, takes its name from the fact that a nobleman, named Podone, donated the money to build it in 871.  Remodeled in 1440, and again in 1625, it is an inviting sight, set…

Milan – A City that Never Grows Old – Day 3 – Part 1

We were out nice and early, on our last day in Milan.  We wanted to get in as much exploring as possible, before heading to our next destination.  A plaque, on a nearby building, marked the house where the writer, Giovanni Battista Bazzoni, lived and wrote one of his most popular books, Il Castello di…

Milan – A City that Never Grows Old – Day 2 – Part 5

The Archeological Museum’s path leads one to the Polygonal Tower, which dates from the Middle Ages.  Do yourself a favor, and step inside the structure, before visiting the rest of the museum, in order to see the lovely frescoes that adorn the lower walls! The modern sculpture, found on the floor of the tower is…

Milan – A City that Never Grows Old – Day 2 – Part 4

Our next destination was right next to the Chiesa  di San Maurizio, the Civico Museo Archeologico di Milano, or the Archaeological Museum of Milan, found at Corso Magenta, #15. The museum is housed in what used to be the convent of the Monastero Maggiore.  Admission is €5.00 per person, and it is open Tuesday through…